Blood, Sweat, and Sawdust

Going against the grain

Tag: Bandsaw

The Tale of the Tail Jig

Jig1My handsaw skills might be lacking, but I do enjoy cutting most of my joinery by hand. However, when I have a bunch of identical joints to cut, I turn to jigs.

I recently discovered this little jig for cutting tails on the bandsaw. It’s little more than a wedge with a stop at one end. To make it, you simply cut a wedge to your desired angle, cut off the tip, flip it around and glue it back on. To use it, you register your board on the stop and slide the opposite edge along the fence of your bandsaw.

Jig2

The beauty of this jig is that you can make several cuts without adjusting your fence. Start by marking out your tails on  one end of your board.  Using the jig, adjust the fence of your bandsaw to line up with your first cut. Assuming your tails are symmetrical, you should be able to take two cuts from each end of your board. You end up only needing to adjust the fence once for each tail you’re cutting.  Dead square tails are just icing on the cake.

What jigs do you use to supplement your handtool work?

The Tension Builds…

Ripped and stickered

Ripped and stickered

I decided to go ahead and rip all of my 2×12 stock in half to speed up the drying process. I knew there would be some tension built up in some of the boards, but a few of them where downright scary. I had one split for the last two feet of the board. This caused one half to slide off my roller stand. The back end kicked up and hit the blade guards fairly hard. No damage was done, but it gave me quite a scare. The split shifted the cut a few inches, making one have too narrow to use for my top. I’ll save this for my long stretchers.

I sorted and labeled all of my boards, saving the best for the front and back of the top. If you’re ripping construction lumber, keep a few extra roller stands handy. Also, be prepared to clean your tools free of pitch when you’re finished. You might even consider buying an extra band saw blade for this project.  Simple Green took care of the blade and a ruler scraped the tires free of debris.

You can find links to my other Roubo posts here:  Project Index

New Toy

After months of deliberation and daydreaming, I finally picked up my first bandsaw. I chose the Rikon 10-325 14″ bandsaw for several reasons. There is a dealer near by (Highland Hardware). It meets all of my current needs. It seems to be well liked by the community. And, it has a 5 year warranty. I spent much of the weekend assembling the saw, but haven’t yet been able to start her up. The instructions are somewhat lacking, but assembly was rather straight forward.

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This is the box in which the saw arrives.

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Here are the contents, after opening the box.

20130904-170540.jpg

You first assemble the base, fastening the supplied bolts hand-tight. I choose to use a mobile base that I picked up from Wood Craft. I placed the assembled saw base on the mobile base before things got too heavy. Unfortunately, it slipped my mind to take photos of this step.

You’ll definitely need a friend to lift the saw onto the base. The instructions weren’t very clear on how to mount the saw to the base. Rikon supplies four bolts, each with a hex nut, nylon locking nut, two large washers and a small washer. After consulting Dr. Google, I decided to install the bolts from below the base in the following order: bolt, large washer, base, larger washer, hex nut, saw, small washer, nylon nut.

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Here is a close up of the bolt installation.

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The rest of the assembly is pretty simple. You simply install the table using four hex bolts, and then install all of the accessories. I still need to level the table and set the blade tracking. I plan to have a full review sometime in the following weeks.

New Toy: Rikon 10-325 Bandsaw

After months of deliberation and daydreaming, I finally picked up my first bandsaw. I chose the Rikon 10-325 bandsaw for several reasons. There is a dealer near by (Highland Hardware). It meets all of my current needs. It seems to be well liked by the community. And, it has a 5 year warranty. I spent much of the weekend assembling the saw, but haven’t yet been able to start her up. The instructions are somewhat lacking, but assembly was rather straight forward.

20130904-170320This is the box in which the saw arrives.

 

20130904-170440Here are the contents, after opening the box.

 

20130904-170540

You first assemble the base, fastening the supplied bolts hand-tight. I choose to use a mobile base that I picked up from Wood Craft. I placed the assembled saw base on the mobile base before things got too heavy. Unfortunately, it slipped my mind to take photos of this step.

You’ll definitely need a friend to lift the saw onto the base. The instructions weren’t very clear on how to mount the saw to the base. Rikon supplies four bolts, each with a hex nut, nylon locking nut, two large washers and a small washer. After consulting Dr. Google, I decided to install the bolts from below the base in the following order: bolt, large washer, base, larger washer, hex nut, saw, small washer, nylon nut.

20130904-170823

Here is a close up of the bolt installation.

Rikon 10-325 Bandsaw

The rest of the assembly is pretty simple. You simply install the table using four hex bolts, and then install all of the accessories. I still need to level the table and set the blade tracking. I plan to have a full review sometime in the following weeks.